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Overview

Overview

The Gordon District Cricket Club is one of Sydney's oldest cricket clubs, and has participated in Sydney's premier grade cricket competition since 1905.

Throughout this time, the club has enjoyed much success, with a particularly golden era in the first half of the 90s, when the club won consecutive first grade premierships.  

(Gordon's first grade captain Harry Evans in action)

In the 2012-13 season Gordon won two premierships with the third grade and fifth grade teams both successful.

The grade club is also an active supporter of junior and women's cricket on the North Shore - through both administrative involvement and coaching support.

Our junior club, the Gordon District Junior Club is part of our affiliated junior association the North Shore Junior Cricket Association which is one of the largest junior associations in Sydney. Based in the heart of the North Shore, Gordon boasts excellent facilities at Chatswood, Killara, Chatswood and Beauchamp Ovals, that are conveniently accessed by players and supporters alike.

The club operates a very successful cricket Academy for Under 21 players that has 70 members each season and 20 existing members or graduates have played first grade and higher. 

The Gordon Wowen's Cricket Club is an integral part of cricket on the North Shore and have continued a run of success with many premierships over the last few seasons.

The Macquarie University Cricket Club is also an affiliate of the Gordon Cricket Club through the development of the club's alliance with the University. 

Now 108 years old,  we look forward to the future with a great deal of confidence and optimism that Gordon will be continue to be one of the strongest and most professionally run clubs in Sydney. This success will be achieved through a combination of a professional and hard working administration, high calibre club coaches, a solid financial position, favourable demographics, quality facilities with Council support and our exceptionally strong junior base.

Our Aim

The Gordon District Club is a sporting organisation which aims to promote, foster, and encourage the playing of cricket in the true spirit of sportsmanship.We strive to develop and nurture players to achieve their full potential by providing good coaching and playing facilities and at the same time creating an environment where players enjoy themselves, both on and off the field.

Testimony to this aim was the fact the club won the Sydney Cricket Association "Spirit of Cricket" Award in 2007/08 and again in 20010/11 and has been in the top 5 in each of the last 5 seasons.

Club Records

Club Records

We have had many memorable performances over the 100+ years that the Gordon District Cricket Club has been around. To view all of the most current Club Records click on the appropriate heading below.

* Individual season runs and wickets

* Club Aggregate records


* Partnership records


* Scores of 200 or more


* 500 runs in a season


* 50 wickets in season


* Wicket Keeping records


* Gordon Representative Players


* Gordon Officials

Hall of Fame

Hall of Fame

The Gordon District Cricket Club turned 100 years old in 2005 and to celebrate the club has created a Hall of Fame where players of special quality and outstanding effort will be honoured for their contribution to the Club.

The Club has decided to name three of the great names of Australian Cricket of the past as the first inductees and follow this with a number of other inductees as part of the 100 year celebrations.

The first three inductees are Victor Trumper, Charlie McCartney and Bert Oldfield.


To view a resume of each player, click on their name below.

 


Bert Oldfield

Bert Oldfield

Wisden cricketer of the year in 1927, Bert Oldfield was a classy wicketkeeper who filled the position in the Australian team for most of the years between the World Wars.                                                                             

Bert was born in the Sydney suburb of Alexandria on September 9th 1894.

He died on August 10th 1976.

Date

Event

1915

Enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force, serving with the 15th Field Ambulance.

1919

Came to the selectors attention as a member of the AIF team.

1919/20

Played for NSW in the Sheffield Shield.

1920/21

Made his Test debut in the First Test against England at the SCG, sharing 'keeping duties with Hanson Carter until Carter's retirement at the end of the series.

1922

Opened a sports store in George Street Sydney, becoming a successful businessman.

1927

Named Wisden's Cricketer of the Year.

1933

A capable batsmen, Oldfield was knocked unconscious and suffered a fractured skull after being hit by a ball from England's Harold Larwood during the controversial Adelaide Test of the infamous "Bodyline" series.

1936/37

His last Test match for Australia was the 5th Test against England in Melbourne.

1921-37

Oldfield had made 130 dismissals in 54 Tests, including 52 stumpings. 1938 Published "Behind The Wicket".

1939

Commissioned a Lieutenant in the 17th Battalion.

1941

Promoted to Captain. 1943 Promoted to Major.

1954

Published "The Rattle of the Stumps".

1970

Awarded the Order of the British Empire (O.B.E.).

1976

August 10th - Died in the Sydney suburb of Killara

Charles Macartney

Charles Macartney

Full name: Charles George Macartney

Born: June 27, 1886, West Maitland, New South Wales

Died: September 9, 1958, Little Bay, Sydney, New South Wales (aged 72 years 74 days)

Major teams: Australia, New South Wales, Otago

Also known as: The Governor General

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Slow left-arm orthodox

STATISTICS

Batting and fielding averages





class

mat

inns

no

runs

hs

ave

100

50

6s

ct

st

Tests

35

55

4

2131

170

41.78

7

9

3

17

0

First-class

249

360

32

15019

345

45.78

49

53

 

102

0





Bowling averages





class

mat

balls

runs

wkts

bbi

bbm

ave

econ

sr

4

5

10

Tests

35

3561

1240

45

7/58

11/85

27.55

2.08

79.13

1

2

1

First-class

249

24228

8782

419

7/58

 

20.95

2.17

57.82

 

17

1

Charles George Macartney, who died in Sydney on September 9 1958, aged 72, was one of the most brilliant and attractive right-handed batsmen in the history of Australian cricket. Daring and confident, he possessed a quickness of eye, hand and foot, a perfection of timing which made him a menace to the best of bowlers. Sydney H. Pardon, then Editor of Wisden, wrote of him in 1921 as a law to himself'an individual genius, but not in any way to be copied. He constantly did things that would be quite wrong for an ordinary batsman, but by success justified all his audacities. Except Victor Trumper at his best, no Australian batsman has ever demoralised our bowlers to the same extent.

Of medium height and stocky build, The Governor-General, as MacArtney came to be known, was specially good in cutting and hitting to leg, though there was no stroke, orthodox or unorthodox, of which he did not show himself master. Intolerant of batsmen who did not treat bowling upon its merits, he was quoted as giving, not long before his death, as the reason why he had ceased to be a regular cricket spectator: I can't bear watching luscious half-volleys being nudged gently back to bowlers. Yet in regard to his own achievements this man with the Napoleonic features could not have been more modest; he had no regard at all for records or averages, nor was he ever known to complain about an umpire's decision.

How punishing a batsman he could be was never more fully demonstrated than in 1921 when, at Trent Bridge, he took such full advantage of a missed chance when nine that he reached 345 from the Nottinghamshire bowling in less than four hours with four 6's and forty-seven 4's among his figures. This still stands as the highest innings put together by an Australian in England and, furthermore, no other batsman in first-class cricket has scored as many runs in a single day. It was also the third of four centuries in following innings, the others being 105 v. Hampshire at Southampton, 193 v. Northamptonshire at Northampton and 115 v. England at Leeds, where he performed the rare feat of getting to three figures before lunch.

From the time that he made his first appearance for Australia in 1907 till he ended his Test career in 1926, MacArtney represented his country 35 times, scoring 2,132 runs, including seven centuries, average 41.80. His highest Test innings was 170 against England at Sydney in 1920'21. He headed the Australia averages with 86.66 that season and also figured at the top in England in 1926 when, with the aid of innings of 151, 133 not out and 109, his average was 94.60. He took part in twelve Test partnerships of 100 or more, the biggest being 235 with W. M. Woodfull for the second wicket against England at Leeds in 1926.

For all the batting prowess he revealed later, it was as a slow left-arm bowler that MacArtney did his best work when first visiting England in 1909. During the tour he took 71 wickets at a cost of 17.46 runs each, and he played a big part in the overthrow of England at Leeds by dismissing seven batsmen for 58 runs in the first innings and four for 27 in the second. In an unofficial Australian tour of America in 1913, his ability as an all-rounder reached such heights that he hit 2,390 runs and took 180 wickets, finishing at the top of both sets of averages. As a fieldsman, particularly at mid-off, he had few equals.

He accomplished much fine work for New South Wales, for whom he first played in 1905, scoring 2,443 runs, average 42.12, with 201 against Victoria in 1913'14 his highest innings. Twice he got two separate centuries in a match'119 and 126 for his State against the South Africans in 1910'11 and 142 and 121 for the Australians against Sussex at Hove in 1912. In all cricket his runs numbered 15,003, average 45.87, and he hit 48 hundreds.

Of him, Sir Jack Hobbs said: I saw him begin his Test career in Australia and we thought him a very unorthodox player, but we soon realised he was brilliant. He hit particularly hard through the covers and frequently cut even fast bowlers off his stumps. He certainly had a wonderful eye. He was a charming fellow and a highly confident cricketer.

Victor Trumper

Victor Trumper

Full name: Victor Thomas Trumper

Born: November 2, 1877, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales

Died: June 28, 1915, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales (aged 37 years 238 days)

Major teams: Australia, New South Wales

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Relations: Son, V Trumper jnr

STATISTICS

Batting and fielding averages

class

mat

inns

no

runs

hs

ave

100

50

6s

ct

st

Tests

48

89

8

3163

214*

39.04

8

13

4

31

0

First-class

255

401

21

16939

300*

44.57

42

87

 

173

0


Bowling averages

class

mat

balls

runs

wkts

bbi

bbm

ave

econ

sr

4

5

10

Tests

48

546

317

8

3/60

3/87

39.62

3.48

68.25

0

0

0

First-class

255

3822

2008

64

5/19

 

31.37

3.15

59.71

 

2

0

Perhaps more than any number one batsman Victor Trumper could not be measured by the number of runs he scored. If arithmetic runs were the sole criterion, he would not have been regarded as one of the greatest batsmen of all time. Most of the other greats of his time freely admitted that they were not even fit to be compared with Trumper. Many people, who also saw the legendary Sir Donald Bradman, swore that Trumper was the more accomplished batsman, although statistics say otherwise.

Altham once wrote, "His genius was essentially qualitative rather than quantitative, revealed in terms of spontaneous art rather than in any acquired technique." In other words, it was the manner in which this legend batted that separated him from the others. He did not believe that there was any ball, which could not be scored off. He was gifted with a great eye and a quick pair of feet. He was a true athlete. His strength lied in playing the ball late.

"He dealt with good-length balls in the way that an ordinary forcing first-class batsman deals with half-volleys and long hops," wrote Col Philip Trevor, Former MCC's manager in Australia. He was far more interested in the success of his side than personal glory. He was totally selfless. He enjoyed cricket but not its attendant glories. He disliked the adulation of the crowds. He far preferred the company of his family to admirers and did not drink or smoke. Indeed, his nature was as hard to describe as his cricket.

Trumper's reticence, honesty and inclination for living day to day gave him little head for the business enterprise he undertook towards the end of his life. He won the affection of all classes in Australia and his heroics against England helped fuel the country's young flames of nationalism. When he died at the age of 37 due to Bright's disease, shortly after contracting scarlet fever, in a private hospital near to the place where he was born about 20,000 people lined the Sydney streets, forming a three-and-a-half mile procession behind his funeral cortege.

History

History

Founded in 1905, the Gordon District Cricket Club has a proud history.

Throughout it's history, Gordon has participated in the main Sydney Grade Cricket competition. During this period the clubs has won the club championship four times and the first grade premiership on six occasions (including back to back premierships in 89/90 and 90/91). As well as its premiership successes, Gordon has produced a long list of representative players - including 19 Australian representatives and 37 NSW players.

Amongst these are some of the greatest names in Australian cricket - Charlie McCartney, Victor Trumper, Bert Oldfield, Neil Harvey and Brian Taber. Gordon's record of producing first class cricketers has continued throughout more recent eras - names like Adam Gilchrist, Phil Emery and Matthew Nicholson all began their grade cricket careers at Gordon.

Our most recent addition was Beau Casson who played one Test for Australia in the Third Test aginst West Indies at the end of the 2007/08 season.

In recent seasons the club has won several lower grade premierships with the 2012-13 season seeing both Third Grade and Fifth Grade successful.

But the history of the club is much more than the premierships and representative players. The club has had many great moments - on and off the field - and has had many great characters.

Most importantly it has, over the years, been a most enjoyable place to play cricket.

Reflecting this history and tradition, the club today boasts a strong following amongst North Shore cricket fans, and a long list of ex-players who continue to support the club.

Our Grounds

Our Grounds

We are very fortunate to have some magnificant grounds on which to play our cricket. These grounds are in Willoughby and Ku-ring-gai Councils. For a map of the location of each of the Gordon Grounds please click on link for each ground below:

Chatswood Oval

Killara Oval

Beauchamp Oval

Turramurra Oval

The members of the club enjoy a range of excellent facilities.

From the formation of the club, Chatswood Oval has been the home to the Gordon District Cricket Club. Chatswood Oval is a classic example of an historic Sydney suburban cricket oval, complete with traditional grandstand.

Situated in the heart of the Chatswood CBD and next door to Chatswood station, Chatswood oval is conveniently located from both the City and the whole of the North Shore - whether travelling by car or train.

Today Chatswood remains the focal point for the Gordon Club and is one of the club's 2 main grounds, as well as being the oval used for training.

The club's other main ground is Bert Oldfield Park or more commonly known as Killara Oval. In recent years this oval has been refurbished and is mainly used for third and fourth grade matches. 

Situated in a quiet, tree lined part of the North Shore, Killara Oval is a high quality cricket ground, with a lovely picturesque setting.

For lower grade matches we also use Beauchamp Park in Nicholson Street Chatswood within Willoughby Council and Turramurra Oval within Ku-ring-gai Council.

The players and supporters use the facilities of The Orchard for after match functions and committee meetings.

 

Chatswood Oval

Chatswood Oval

 Map Location of Chatswood Oval

Corner of Albert Ave and Orchard Road Chatswood

Killara Oval

Killara Oval

Map Location of Killara Oval (W.A Bert Oldfield Oval)

Rosebery Road and Wattle Street Killara  

 

Beauchamp Oval

Beauchamp Oval

Map Location of Beauchamp Oval

Nicholson Street Chatswood

 

Turramurra Oval

Turramurra Oval

Map Location of Turramurra Oval

Corners of Eastern and Karuah Roads Turramurra                                                    

 

 

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